Forum Replies Created

  • Jonathan EppeleJonathan Eppele
    Moderator

    Finished Phase Plant.

    The Rev2 will be hard to get my hands on, since the nearest store that sells it is 3 hours away from me. Additionally, it is quite pricey to buy. I wonder if they’d be willing to rent.

    In reply to: Phase Question

    February 19, 2021 at 5:22 am #40911
    Jonathan EppeleJonathan Eppele
    Moderator

    Hi there,

    What’s an example of phase differences that’ve caused you to set a control incorrectly?

    Off the top of my head, the Oscillator Start button should sync up the phases with every key press.

    Jonathan EppeleJonathan Eppele
    Moderator

    Added in a guide for GMS. Free subtractive synth VST on one of the most popular DAWs, FL Studio.

    In reply to: Daft time – the prime time of your life

    February 10, 2021 at 8:07 pm #40735
    Jonathan EppeleJonathan Eppele
    Moderator

    Sounds like a distortion effect, very much unlike that used in Syntorial.

    After experimenting with different distortion types in Serum, I found that “Downsample” gave the closest, grinding almost 8-bit character to this sound. There are a few other things you have to do the sound to get it to match this patch, though. Here’s what I did:

    Osc: Saw.

    Osc 2: Medium Pulse, transposed up an octave.

    Filter: I used Serum’s Distortion filter (on Pre), but you can also use the synth’s built-in filter. Low Pass, 24 dB. Have the cutoff down very low.

    Resonance: The more you increase this, the more of that sweeping 8-bit character you get.

    Distortion: Use Downsample. I found a good Drive setting to be at 31%. You do not want to crank it all the way, or you’ll lose the full sound this synth has in the bottom end.

    Filter Envelope: Have the amount at a point where you’re happy with the amount of sweep you hear. Set the attack stage to a point where you’re satisfied with the speed of the sweep. Set the release stage as long as you can, because…

    Amp Envelope: A little bit of release, not much. You don’t hear the filter moving during the amp release in this patch, which is the reason for making the filter envelope release so long.

    Let me know if this helps. I’m unsure of whether or not that nasty grind sound after some of the notes are played is actually part of this patch.

    In reply to: Imperatrice – sine, saw lead?

    January 11, 2021 at 9:03 pm #40161
    Jonathan EppeleJonathan Eppele
    Moderator

    I watched a video on the SH-101 since I’ve never used it before (embedded below). It seems like you can move the sub oscillator on that synth up and down an octave, so it shouldn’t affect the sound. As for the patch itself:

    Osc: A pulse wave. The pulse width should be between a square wave and a medium pulse.

    Filter: Low pass, 24 dB. The sound should be round, and depending on whether or not you use key tracking, the filter’s cutoff will have to be pretty set high for those high notes.

    Reverb: Pretty wet mix, fairly large room.

    LFO: Modulate the pitch for that vibrato. 1/4 time, very small amount.

    Portamento: Give your notes a little bit of bending by turning this up. You should be able to hear the transition but it shouldn’t be too long either.

    I can’t speak for which synth in Arturia Collection V will give the closest sound since I’ve never used those synths before. But any decent subtractive synth should give you a very close sound to the song’s patch using these settings.

    Hope this helps!

    In reply to: Patch Request – The Streets – Blinded By The Lights

    January 8, 2021 at 12:35 pm #40111
    Jonathan EppeleJonathan Eppele
    Moderator

    Sorry for getting to you so late. This is the patch, recreated in Sylenth1.

    Attachments:

    In reply to: Imperatrice – sine, saw lead?

    January 8, 2021 at 12:24 pm #40109
    Jonathan EppeleJonathan Eppele
    Moderator

    Hi Emilio,

    Which sound are you referring to? Is it the high-pitched lead? Let me know and I’ll be happy to help.

    In reply to: Patch Request: Pad sound

    January 8, 2021 at 12:18 pm #40106
    Jonathan EppeleJonathan Eppele
    Moderator

    This patch is very interesting. Had to use a few tricks to get it to sound close to what you hear.

    Osc: On a subtractive synth, two square waves gives the sound closest to the “Oooh” choir sound which is this patch’s base (tweak the pulse width if you can to see if any small changes improve it. Ideally you could pass a vocal sample through all of the below effects). Transpose one up an octave.

    Unison: Two voices, give it a little detune to achieve the pulsating effect in the patch. You may also find that chorus works, with a little mix.

    Phaser: This is what jumped out to me the most on this patch. The phaser’s movement is very slow, so if you have the option, set the phaser’s rate to 8/1 (assuming this track has a tempo of 162 BPM). 100% mix. Turn the feedback up pretty high.

    Noise: This is crucial, as the noise helps you hear the phaser movement within those highs, even though the oscillators are low-passed (more on that later). You don’t need much noise to hear the movement.

    Delay: You can hear the sound echoing subtly, especially if you listen to the phaser effect. 1/4 time, modest mix, low feedback, no spread.

    Reverb: 50-50 mix, large room.

    Here’s the tricky part that involves some layering:

    Pass the square waves through a low pass filter to get rid of the buzzy high end, but pass the noise through an all pass filter (pretty much, no filtering at all). This way you can still hear the phaser in the high end while keeping the sound nice and round.

    Hope this helps!

    In reply to: Patch Request: Frank Ocean – Pyramids (1:20)

    November 19, 2020 at 11:03 pm #38533
    Jonathan EppeleJonathan Eppele
    Moderator

    According to your description you’re already pretty close. There’s a few subtle changes here to give that “tight” sound of the patch.

    Osc: Saw.

    Filter: Band Pass, 12 dB. Set pretty low. Usually for leads you would use a 24 dB filter slope, but I found that this shape was too narrow. Using the 12 dB helped give the fuller sound while still cutting out the necessary lows and highs.

    You might think with the wide range of notes that the cutoff would need Key Tracking. Personally, I didn’t find this necessary.

    Reverb: Small mix, small room. Don’t give it enough reverb to muddy the sequence.

    Delay: About 70-30 Dry-Wet, 1/2 time. Experiment with the feedback until you find the ringing out you’re looking for.

    By the way, this isn’t a chromatic scale. I can’t quite figure out the exact sequence of notes, but it’s close to an F minor scale, starting at F3 and ending at C7.

    Hope this helps!

    In reply to: Patch Request – The Streets – Blinded By The Lights

    November 6, 2020 at 2:20 pm #38260
    Jonathan EppeleJonathan Eppele
    Moderator

    I took a listen to the track, and here’s what I came to:

    Osc: Saw.

    Unison: 6 voices, give it enough detune to smear the patch but not enough to sound pitchy. Full stereo. Keep Retrig (Start) off.

    Filter: Low Pass, 24dB. Just to shave off a little high end, nothing too drastic here.

    LFO: I used a medium pulse wave as my waveform, and routed it to volume. This gives the gate effect you’re looking for. I had my rate set as 1/8D in Sylenth. If you decide to recreate this patch somewhere else, be sure to keep the LFO in Mono Trigger mode, to sync up the notes, but have it restart whenever you play a note.

    Polyphony: 2 voices.

    One final thing: I notice in the track that the low notes are louder than the high notes. To make up for this, I routed Key Tracking to volume and cranked it in the negative direction (this way, higher notes sound quieter and lower notes sound louder). It could also be done, theoretically, with velocity, but for the purposes of performance, I find that Key Tracking makes the patch easier to play.

    Hope this helps!

    Jonathan EppeleJonathan Eppele
    Moderator

    The movement in this patch was tricky, but I think I found a way to get that lower cutoff in the beginning combined with the sharper, more nasal, brighter notes in the mid-section. Let’s begin with the base sound:

    Osc: Square wave. You’ll see why to use this in a bit.

    Filter: Low Pass, 24 dB. At its minimum, it should be very round, almost sounding like a sine wave.

    Reverb: Small mix, medium-sized room, just to put some space around your sound. You can hear it in the patch.

    Delay: It’s subtle, but it’s there. Small mix, modest feedback. Timing is 1/8D (dotted eighth note). This isn’t available on Serum (what I recreated the patch on) so you’ll have to use the un-synced method.

    Filter Envelope: This is the only way I could get that little pop at the beginning of the notes. Very small amount, and very quick decay. Experiment with the settings to get something you like.

    Now for the fun part. To achieve the notes varying cutoffs and resonances and overall timbres, I routed an LFO to 3 destinations. Here’s what I did:

    Rate: 4 bars.

    Waveform: Triangle. I can hear the modulation moving up in 3 bars, and down in 1. So you should drag the peak to the right by one bar.

    Keep the LFO’s trigger off. Otherwise you’ll never be able to hear the movement.

    Route the LFO’s destination to the following: Pulse Width, Cutoff and Resonance.

    Modulating the Pulse Width gives the rounder notes on the bottom and the more nasal notes on top.

    Modulating the Cutoff allows for the brighter notes you hear on the track.

    Modulating the Resonance allows for the more focused sounds on top, that you hear along with the higher cutoff.

    Experiment with all of the LFO amounts until you find what you’re looking for.

    Let me know if this helps!

    In reply to: Patch Request – The Streets – Blinded By The Lights

    October 21, 2020 at 7:25 pm #38058
    Jonathan EppeleJonathan Eppele
    Moderator

    Hi there,

    Post a link to the track with a time stamp of the patch and I’ll be happy to help 🙂

    In reply to: Mixing and matching waveforms

    October 21, 2020 at 6:58 pm #38056
    Jonathan EppeleJonathan Eppele
    Moderator

    I love Spidericemidas’ patches. You might notice that a lot of them use FM, Sync or Ring Mod. These three parameters create an endless array of raw sounds.

    If you’re talking about patches without any of these mutations, it’s honestly just a matter of experimentation. In the patches I’ve programmed, one setup I use that involves no FM, Sync or Ring Mod has Saw as Osc 1, and a Square as Osc 2. If you switch these two waveforms, you get a sound that sounds like two saws but with more low end.

    Another thing I like to do is have a Sine Wave as Osc 1 and a brighter waveform like a Saw or Square as Osc 2, for a very round low end and a brighter note on top. This is actually a pretty noticeable change. As far as I know in Syntorial we never use the Sine Wave by itself, and its main purpose is for FM and Ring Mod.

    Within the realm of FM, one combination I like that “breaks the rules” of Syntorial is using two Square waves instead of two Sine waves. I find that it gives a very jagged metallic sound, and when combined with the low pass filter it can sound kind of like Distortion. Using an FM Mod Envelope with this can help create some really cool sounds. I’ve also used mild FM on two Saw Waves.

    Within the realm of Ring Mod and Sync, since Oscillator 2 is the carrier, you can try combining both mutations. I find that where Ring Mod gives a metallic quality, and Sync gives a grittier quality, using both gets you a sound in between. Plus, using Sync helps you tune up the Ring Mod sound if its sound isn’t in tune with the note you’re playing (a side effect of Ring Mod).

    And of course, you don’t have to keep the mix knob at 100/0 or 0/100 for either of these settings, respectively. That’s yet another parameter to play around with.

    To be honest, when I’m making a patch, I like to start with a basic doubled and transposed sound, and go back and tweak the waveforms after I’m getting somewhere interesting with my sound. Using different transposed oscillators for me isn’t so much a raw sound to begin with as much as it is an experiment to see if it improves the sound I’m programming.

    Compared to other effects like the Filter Envelope, the Amp Envelope, the LFO, and the various effects you have available, I find that using different waveforms usually doesn’t contribute a whole lot to the sound (unless you’re using a mutation). Of course, every parameter on its own makes a change to your sound ranging from indistinguishable to pretty noticeable, but putting them altogether creates that unique timbre you’re looking for. There are loads of other tricks that you could use that “break the rules” in Syntorial but if used carefully can create sounds of Spidericemidas quality.

    In short, try combining Saws with Squares, or Sines with other waveforms. Experiment as much as you can. But don’t fret too much over using different waveforms, as there’s many other controls that can make your sound completely different. Try looking at some of Spidericemidas’ controls and tweaking your synth accordingly to see what happens. That’s what inspired several of my own patches. There’s an endless array of sounds you can make 🙂

    In reply to: Patch Request Joji Your Man

    October 14, 2020 at 5:44 pm #37964
    Jonathan EppeleJonathan Eppele
    Moderator

    Hi there,

    Gave this recreation a shot and got something pretty close. Here’s how I did it:

    Osc: Saw.

    Sub Osc: Square. Turn it down so it’s noticeable but doesn’t overtake the saw sound.

    Filter: Band Pass, 24 db. Turn it down to a setting with quite a bit of lows left in. I thought it was Low Pass at first, but I found there was too much low end left in, and I wasn’t getting the right-sounding filter movement. More on that incoming…

    Filter Envelope: Very, very fast attack, followed by a somewhat slow decay. This helps you get that horn attack present in the sound.

    Resonance: Turn it up a little, just to make the movement more noticeable.

    Chorus: There’s some shimmering movement in this patch, and I believe it comes from chorus. Give it a somewhat slow rate, but to increase the intensity of the pulsation, turn up the depth knob, if possible.

    Let me know if this helps!

    P.S. I really like the song 🙂

    In reply to: Patch Request

    October 13, 2020 at 2:29 am #37930
    Jonathan EppeleJonathan Eppele
    Moderator

    Hi there,

    This is a pretty simple patch here. Here’s what I did:

    Osc 1: Triangle Wave. Use this waveform for a heavy, round sound.

    Osc 2: Triangle Wave, transposed up 7 semitones. If you can, pan this oscillator to the right.

    Filter: Low Pass, 24 dB. You don’t need to take off much here, but slice off some buzz on top.

    Amp Envelope: Very fast decay and release. This helps give the “pluck” characteristic in this sound.

    Velocity: Route this to volume, so notes play louder depending on how hard you hit the key.

    Hope this helps!