Forum Replies Created

  • Joe HanleyJoe Hanley
    Keymaster

    After fiddling around with distortions, filters, etc I finally got what I needed out of the multiband compressor (ooooooooooh multiband). It creates that aggressive compression that really makes the saw jump out. A couple other effects, and that’s it. Not much synthesis at play here.

    How It’s Made

    • Synth: Serum
    • Oscillator: Saw.
    • Voices: Mono, with 47 ms portamento
    • Distortion: Type is Downsample, with Drive at 62% to create that high nastiness making the sound just a little cheap. Mix set to 22% so it’s just subtly layered in
    • Compressor: Threshold -54 dB, Ratio 4:1, Attack 16.3 ms, Release 90 ms, Gain 30 dB, Multiband enabled, High 94%, Mid 168%, Low 171%. Those settings bring the highs down, and the lows/mids up, creating a nice bassy saw. And then dial back the mix to 70% to let some of the clean unadulterated saw through
    • Reverb: Type is Hall, Size is 51% to give us the feeling of a large room, but Decay is at 0.8s, so that the reverb tail doesn’t last too long and muddy up the sound. No Low or High cut. Spin at 20%, Spin Depth at 25%. Mix at 17% so that it’s mostly dry
    Attachments:

    In reply to: Tom Misch Synth Pads

    September 11, 2018 at 12:20 pm #19959
    Joe HanleyJoe Hanley
    Keymaster

    Damn. This song is good. I think it’s a filtered saw.

    How It’s Made

    • Synth: Serum
    • Oscillator: Saw wave, 3-voice unison with low detune and even blend
    • Filter: MG Low 24, Cutoff at 1199 hz, Res at 23%, Drive at 63%, Level at 21%
    • Modulation: Amp envelope with Attack at 126 ms, Dec at 2.44 s, Sus at 0. LFO routed to Osc A level, with a Tri waveform, fast rate, and very little modulation amount, so that it just creates a subtle wobble
    • Portamento: Knob at Noon, Curve curved upward so that the pitch bend starts quick but slows into the destination note. Though the bending pitch may be triggered manually, since it doesn’t come in on every note.
    Attachments:

    In reply to: PATCH CHALLENGE: House Organ

    September 10, 2018 at 1:07 pm #19913
    Joe HanleyJoe Hanley
    Keymaster

    do I get 1-2 stars? 😀

    Definitely 2! I think you really nailed the tone. So much so, I think the stacked sine and FM approach is probably along the lines of what the original patch actually is. Nice work.

    In reply to: How to: Pad / melody tones

    September 7, 2018 at 9:47 am #19764
    Joe HanleyJoe Hanley
    Keymaster

    This one was HARD. It seemed simple but I had to experiment a lot with this one, with both the patch and the notes, and I still think it’s not all the way there.

    In the end I had to use two tracks, one for the upper notes, and one for the lower notes, so that I could turn the lower notes down a bit. Same patch for both.

    How It’s Made

    • Synth: Serum
    • Oscillator: Sine wave, 3-voice unison with mild detune and even blend and 50% width. Random phase start set to 0, and phase set to 0, so that the unison starts with a bit of an attack transient
    • FX: Slow chorus to create more wide movement and fluctuations. A strong compressor AFTER the chorus, to create an even-ish volume but also to fight with the fluctuations from the chorus and unison, creating unpredictable and uncomfortable movement.
    • Filter: This comes after the chorus/compressor. Moog LP 24, Cutoff at 283 hz, tons of res so that it self-oscillates a bit, full drive. The fluctations from the chorus/compressor will fluctuate the amount of filter drive to add even more uneasy movement
    • Modulation: Envelope routed to cutoff with a 2.21 second decay. Very little mod amount so that beginning of each note is just a little bit brighter than the rest
    • EQ: Generous and wide boost at 93 hz. Beef up the bottom end
    • Notes: For the higher synth it’s A for the highest note, with F and D below it. And then the lower synth continues downward for a big chord, starting from the top and going down: Bb G Eb D Bb G Eb D. Turn the lower synth down a bit
    • Overall volume of the collective synths should clip every once in a while creating little static spikes. Kind of gives it a vinyl like feel

    Funny thing is, this might’ve been done in a much simpler manner, using some random synth or effect. However, it’s still an interesting exercise in creating that unpredictable and kind of uncomfortable fluctuation in sound.

    Attachments:

    In reply to: Patch Request : Hands up Lead

    September 6, 2018 at 4:12 pm #19705
    Joe HanleyJoe Hanley
    Keymaster

    My bad. How about now?

    In reply to: Patch Request : Hands up Lead

    September 6, 2018 at 3:13 pm #19688
    Joe HanleyJoe Hanley
    Keymaster

    Hi. You can upload files by scrolling down to the bottom of the page, and right above the Submit button you’ll see an Attachments option.

    In reply to: Patch Request: Lead from "The Cars – Let's Go"

    September 6, 2018 at 12:33 pm #19658
    Joe HanleyJoe Hanley
    Keymaster

    This patch is made my modulating Oscillator Sync. You’re right, the LEAD Acid LFO is similar. It modulates a distorted filter, which achieves a similar effects, but it’s not quite the same.

    How It’s Made

    • Synth: Primer
    • Oscillator: Set mix to 100% Osc 2, set Osc 2 to Square, enable Osc Sync, set Osc 2 semi to 9
    • Modulation: Route Mod Envelope to Osc 2 Pitch. Set Mod Env amount to around noon, and decay to 3885 ms
    • Performance: Mod wheel triggered vibrato. Set LFO destination to Pitch, Amount to 0, and Rate to 1/16. Set Mod Wheel destination to LFO Amount. Crank Mod Wheel whenever you want vibrato
    Attachments:

    In reply to: PATCH CHALLENGE: House Organ

    August 31, 2018 at 8:58 am #18584
    Joe HanleyJoe Hanley
    Keymaster

    The main difference I’m hearing is in the filter. It’s too bright. In my settings I have the cutoff set to 497, but the Low Pass filter is using an 18db slope. Is there an LP18 option? The lower the slope, the brighter the sound. So if there’s isn’t an LP18 option, stick with LP12 and turn the cutoff down until it’s rounder to match the original sound. Then probably boost the res even more. That would be a good place to start.

    In reply to: Question About Unison

    August 28, 2018 at 4:12 pm #18435
    Joe HanleyJoe Hanley
    Keymaster

    for 2 voices, there are 6 oscillators, two sets of osc1, osc2, and sub osc. When it comes to cents, osc1a = +3 cents, osc1b = -3 cents, osc2a = +3 cents, osc2b = -3 cents, then subosca = +3 cents, suboscb = -3 cents? Is that correct?

    You got it!

    In reply to: Detuned Pad

    August 28, 2018 at 10:47 am #18405
    Joe HanleyJoe Hanley
    Keymaster

    I agree with Groov. This is definitely sample based. Looking at Kartir’s Soundcloud, he mentioned “tape loops”. That being said, layering samples and synths is something I’ve been really interested in lately, so…

    I recreated both the round and bright layer. It’s tough to recreate one without the other because they’ll always effect each other. So I started with the round one and then made the bright one. The round one is synth-only, while the bright one is a combination of synth and sample. In the recording you’ll hear both round and bright patches, then just the bright patch, and lastly just the bright patch minus the sample.

    It’s close, not exact. But like Groov said, this sample-based-approach is about bringing in imperfect and organic texture. So really, what’s interesting here is how things mix together and how we can insert imperfection into our patch.

    How It’s Made (the bright one)

    • Synth: Serum
    • Oscillator 1: Saw, pitch raised 12 semitones (1 octave), 6 voice unison, decent amount of detune, with 50% width
    • Oscillator 2: Thin Pulse wave, pitch raised 19 semitones (1 octave plus 7 semitones), 6 voice unison, decent amount of detune, 50% width
    • Noise: Used this for the sample Horns Of Fear, with the pitch raised 45%
    • Filter: LP 12, Cutoff 949 Hz, Decent amount of Res
    • Modulation: Chaos 1 routed to Master Tune to create that occasional out-of-tuneness. Slow rate. Chaos 2 as an Aux source, with S&H enabled and even slower rate. This way, the Chaos 1 out-of-tuneness only kicks in once in a while.
    • FX: Chorus with medium-slow rate and 50% mix. Reverb plate, with medium size, no pre-delay, medium width, 50% wet
    Attachments:

    In reply to: Question About Unison

    August 28, 2018 at 9:48 am #18397
    Joe HanleyJoe Hanley
    Keymaster

    One voice consists of all 3 oscillators – Osc 1, Osc 2 and the Sub Osc. So Syntorial’s Unison takes those 3 oscillators, in whatever state they happen to be in, and doubles (2 voice unison) or quadruples (4 voice unison) the entire set.

    And as you turn the detune knob up, it shifts each voice’s overall pitch up or down. So in the case of 2 voices you have two entire sets of 3 Oscillators. And as you turn up the Detune knob, the overall pitch of the first voice is lowered, while the overall pitch of the second voice is raised. The detuning is symmetrical around the center pitch (the pitch you actually play) so the first voice is lowered the same amount that the second voice is raised.

    So with 2-voice unison you have a total of 6 oscillators. With 4-voice unison you have a total of 12 oscillators.

    In reply to: Need help with a patch.

    August 27, 2018 at 4:37 pm #18384
    Joe HanleyJoe Hanley
    Keymaster

    MIDI attached. In this case it actually is a triad. Bb, Dd and F. And then it sometimes switches to Gb Bb and Eb.

    It’s hard to give general advice on how pitches and sounds interact. It’s such a case-by-case kind of thing. I would say that the lower you play, the wider the intervals have to be. Like in this case, if you played those chords down a couple octaves, it would sound like a muddy mess. The sounds waves are bigger the lower you get, so the overall sound gets thicker, and if you’re not careful that thickness can turn into mud.

    Triads have pitches that are very close to each other, because they use adjacent chord tones. So, if something sounds muddy, one thing you can do is move some of the pitches around. Like a classic open voicing in this case would be to take the middle pitch, Db, and move it up or down one octave. This way, you still get the same 3 pitches, but with much more space between them.

    So I guess a general rule of thumb: The closer the pitches, the thicker it sounds. The farther the pitches, the thinner it sounds.

    Apply that to each case’s specific context of range and sound, and that might help steer towards a cleaner sound.

    Attachments:

    In reply to: PATCH CHALLENGE: House Organ

    August 27, 2018 at 4:22 pm #18382
    Joe HanleyJoe Hanley
    Keymaster

    Can you upload a recording of what you have so far? Maybe I can spot the difference

    In reply to: PATCH REQUEST: Sicko mode Bass

    August 27, 2018 at 9:49 am #18321
    Joe HanleyJoe Hanley
    Keymaster

    Nice dubmethod! That filter/distortion combination sounds right, and it’s simpler than my approach. Simple is good!

    In reply to: PATCH CHALLENGE: House Organ

    August 27, 2018 at 9:44 am #18317
    Joe HanleyJoe Hanley
    Keymaster

    Bill I like that you stacked sine waves, much like an actual organ would. I think it’s really close. I tried that as well, and like you, couldn’t get quite as close as I wanted. I feel like there isn’t enough frequency content with just the two sine waves.

    So I started with a square instead, and filtered it down.

    How It’s Made

    1. Synth: Serum
    2. Oscillator: Square wave, 6 voice unison with a medium detune and medium width
    3. Filter: Low Pass 18, Cutoff at 497 Hz, pretty heavy res with full Fat, and a little drive
    4. FX: very small Plate Reverb, at about 35% wet. And then EQ low shelf to remove just a bit of low end.
    Attachments: