• February 27, 2022 at 3:34 pm #47253
    Synth TalkSynthTalk
    Participant

    Hey all,

    I’ve been devoting a lot of time to Syntorial and have just completed all modules, including related lesson packs for Sylenth1, Serum, and Massive (except for the “Final Challenges” and the associated lesson pack lessons therein, which I’ll dive into after honing the skills taught in the regular modules).

    Right now, I’m focused on applying the skills learned on Syntorial to my own music and have been achieving a lot of success so far.

    My question today relates to using vibrato to create more expressive sounds. So far, all my attempts at putting vibrato on a sound sound goofy or cartoonish, even if I try to dial in a light amount of vibrato. I make “indie rock” music so this instantly sounds out of place.

    Do you have any suggestions on how to make vibrato-like sounds, similar to the rate/range of vibrato found in these songs:

    (in the beginning, you’ll hear “oooohs” in the background, may have to turn volume up)

    (go to 1:28…the speed and range of this vibrato sounds really nice)

    In both these songs, I know it’s a human voice creating the vibrato. I’m not looking to make my vibrato patches sound like a human voice. It’s more the rate/range (“control,” for lack of a better term) that I’m looking for, and the rate/range I hear in my head in that respect sounds similar to the songs above. So I suppose it’s human-like vibrato but I’m not necessarily looking to emulate a vocal sound, if that makes sense.

    So my questions are as follows:

    1. Any suggestions on how to program in a similar vibrato speed/range? I’m assuming I should use an LFO but which LFO shape? Should I be using Fine or CRS? I’m assuming CRS.

    2. Any suggestions on associated waveforms? I feel like it should be something like a sine wave but with a little more edge (I find that Saw and Square can add to the corniness)?

    3. I’m assuming some portamento should be dialed in. Any other suggestions?

    4. In Serum, I’m still not entirely clear on what “Output” does in the Matrix section (the slider all the way on the right). You can dial in the range of the vibrato on the left but what effect does maxing out the Output (or lowering it) do to that range?

    Thank you so much! Looking forward to your thoughts.

    • This topic was modified 2 months, 2 weeks ago by Joe Hanley. Reason: Embedded youtube video
    March 9, 2022 at 5:42 pm #47335
    Joe HanleyJoe Hanley
    Keymaster

    Congrats on finishing Syntorial!

    1. Typically triangle or sine. Sine may be a better choice for a more natural sounding vibrato as the Triangle has a slightly more abrupt U-turn at the top and bottom.

    2. I don’t think it’s a simple as choosing the right waveform. Rather it’s your whole sound that matters. I think any raw waveform will sound kind of corny with vibrato. So it’s more about what you do with that waveform that matters. Like…

    3. Portamento. That’s a good idea. Adding additional bends between notes could make it more natural.

    4. It’s kind of redundant. I never use it. I remember mentioning it somewhere in the Serum Lesson Pack but can’t off the top of my head think of the use I demonstrated. If you don’t need it, don’t use it.

    Can you post an example of what you’ve made so far? It may not be your vibrato settings, but the tone you’re working with. Like you said, those two examples are actual vocals, versus your synth.

    March 11, 2022 at 9:57 am #47349
    Synth TalkSynthTalk
    Participant

    Congrats on finishing Syntorial!

    1. Typically triangle or sine. Sine may be a better choice for a more natural sounding vibrato as the Triangle has a slightly more abrupt U-turn at the top and bottom.

    2. I don’t think it’s a simple as choosing the right waveform. Rather it’s your whole sound that matters. I think any raw waveform will sound kind of corny with vibrato. So it’s more about what you do with that waveform that matters. Like…

    3. Portamento. That’s a good idea. Adding additional bends between notes could make it more natural.

    4. It’s kind of redundant. I never use it. I remember mentioning it somewhere in the Serum Lesson Pack but can’t off the top of my head think of the use I demonstrated. If you don’t need it, don’t use it.

    Can you post an example of what you’ve made so far? It may not be your vibrato settings, but the tone you’re working with. Like you said, those two examples are actual vocals, versus your synth.

    Thanks Joe! See the link to download my current patch (built on Massive). It doesn’t sound great I know; I was trying to match the sound in that Radiohead song I linked above.

    Here’s the link (via WeTransfer): https://we.tl/t-peyrSmwIE9

    March 11, 2022 at 3:29 pm #47355
    Joe HanleyJoe Hanley
    Keymaster

    I wouldn’t say your sound is goofy or cartoonish. But here are some additional things to try:

    1. Set the Vibrato amount to 0, and then assign a slow envelope attack to the Vibrato amount, so that the note starts without vibrato and then gradually brings it in. This is similar to what vocalists do, even in the Radiohead track.

    2. Modulate the wavetable position with the LFO. Very slowly, and very subtle. This makes things sound less static and synthetic because the timbre is changing in subtle ways, much like vocal does.

    3. Add a little Amp Attack swell and a little Amp Release tail. An abrupt start and end sounds very synthetic. So adding a little swell in and out will make these less stiff and more expressive.

    Overal making the sound a bit more realistic will help take away the synethicness of the vibrato

    March 12, 2022 at 4:46 pm #47363
    Synth TalkSynthTalk
    Participant

    Thanks Joe! I’ll definitely try all this!

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